WORD OF THE DAY

If you don’t feel like you’re getting the love you should get, then maybe you should ask yourself if you’re giving the love you should give.

Too often we look only at what other people are doing for us instead of what we are doing for them. However, the Bible instructs us to look out for the needs of one another, to look for ways to serve others, and to walk in love with each other.

In John 13:34-35, Jesus commands us to love: “A new command I give you: Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another. By this all men will know that you are my disciples, if you love one another.”

Love is so important, because every person needs love. People in the world are hungry for love; they’re looking for a source of real, genuine love. Proverbs 19:22 tells us that What a man desires is unfailing love.

We, as Christians, have an opportunity to give that love, which the world desperately desires. So instead of wondering why you’re not getting the love you should get, decide to give the love you should give.



Word of the Week

Be a channel for God’s blessings, not a reservoir.

 

Have you ever wondered why God may not be blessing you as much as you think he should? It could be because you’ve become a reservoir for God’s blessings, rather than a channel.

 

If you’re simply accumulating more and more rather than giving what has been given to you, then God probably won’t bless you. However, if you give away the things that God gives you, then you become a channel through which his blessings flow. He blesses you so that you can bless others.

 

That’s exactly what God promised to Abram: “I will make you into a great nation and I will bless you; I will make your name great, and you will be a blessing” (Genesis 12:2). God promised to bless Abram so that he could be a blessing to others.

 

If you use what you have to bless others, then God will probably bless you with more (so that you can bless others even more). The Bible describes that principle using language of sowing and reaping: you reap what you sow (Galatians 6:7-8).

 

Furthermore, 2 Corinthians 9:6-7 says, Remember this: Whoever sows sparingly will also reap sparingly, and whoever sows generously will also reap generously. Each man should give what he has decided in his heart to give, not reluctantly or under compulsion, for God loves a cheerful giver.

 

These verses are a direct promise from God: If you will sow abundantly with a good (cheerful) attitude, then God will bless you. Why? So that you can bless others. Being a channel for God’s blessings means passing them on to others.

 

This principle of sowing and reaping works in all areas of our life–not just money. You can bless others in ways that don’t necessarily require money.

 

Decide to sow seeds of blessing aggressively, and you’ll discover that God will provide a great abundance for you simply because you’re a channel not a reservoir.



Word of the day

Your spirit is more powerful than your flesh.

1 John 4:4 says, The one who is in you is greater than the one who is in the world. The Holy Spirit, who lives in you if you are born again, is greater than anything in the world, including your flesh. Therefore, you do not have to be controlled by your flesh and worldly lusts.

In Luke 10:19, Jesus says, “I have given you authority to trample on snakes and scorpions and to overcome all the power of the enemy; nothing will harm you.” This verse doesn’t mean that things won’t come against us, but it does mean that even when hard things come against us, God has given us the power to remain peaceful and joyful even in the midst of the difficult circumstances.

Remember that God “is able to do immeasurably more than all we ask or imagine, according to his power that is at work within us” (Ephesians 3:20).

The power God has given us is amazing; however, many Christians never activate that power in their own lives because they don’t really believe that God will personally work in them.

Remember that Jesus said, “it shall be done for you as you have believed” (Matthew 8:13). Therefore, dare to believe that God has given you the power to do awesome things for Him–things that you can only do because your spirit is more powerful than your flesh.



Word of the day

Joyful living requires giving.

Most people are selfish and self-centered, focusing only on what benefits them. Such thinking claims that the more you have, the more you accumulate, and the more attention you receive, the happier you’ll be.

Yet, most of the time, such selfishness only makes a person more depressed than ever. This is because when all you focus on is yourself, you’ll always want more, and you’ll never be satisfied with what you have. On the other hand, if you live focused on how you can bless others and serve them, then God will give you joy.
 
It is no surprise, therefore, that Jesus said, “It is more blessed to give than to receive” (Acts 20:35).
 
Likewise, in John 13:1-17 Jesus is seen washing his disciples’ feet; he sets an example by humbly giving himself to his disciples.
Then, in John 13:17, Jesus tells them, “Now that you know these things, you will be blessed if you do them.”
In other words, you will be blessed, which in the Greek has the meaning of being happy, if you give and serve others. The Bible makes it clear that joyful living requires giving.
 
 


Word of the Day

Nathaniel’s Perspective.

You are precious and of great Value despite where you came from or what you have been through. Just because someone’s perspective about you is bad does not mean you are of no value. God’s perspective is what matters. Wipe your tears and shout that you are valuable in the eyes of God. Nathaniel’s perspective about Jesus did not change who Jesus was, He was still the Son of God.

Your skin color, your credit or social status does not define you in the eyes of God.

John 1:46
“Nazareth! Can anything good come from there?” Nathaniael asked. “Come and see,” said Philip.



Word of the Day

Preach the Gospel at all times; when necessary, use words.

“Preach the Gospel at all times; when necessary, use words.” That advice, originally given by St. Francis of Assisi, is applicable today, because how you behave tells the world what you believe. How you treat others, how you spend your money, how you maintain your house, car, and other possessions, and even how you drive all speak loudly about what you believe.

The world is hungry for something real; they’re searching for answers to life. But the world’s not reading the Bible; they’re reading Christians. And they will recognize true Christians by their fruit, not their mouth, not their bumper sticker, not their cross earrings, but their fruit–their actions (Matthew 7:20).

Clearly, how you behave tells the world what you believe. In other words, your life is a sermon.

Therefore, it is very understandable that James instructs: Do not merely listen to the word, and so deceive yourselves. Do what it says. Anyone who listens to the word but does not do what it says is like a man who looks at his face in a mirror and, after looking at himself, goes away and immediately forgets what he looks like (James 1:22-24).

Faith involves more than hearing and believing; faith demands action. Therefore, the best way to preach the Gospel is to live the Gospel, because how you live boldly declares what you believe.
 


Word of the Day

Are you seeking God’s presence or His presents?

You can learn a lot about what you want simply by examining what you are praying for.

King David said, One thing I ask of the Lord … (Psalm 27:4). He had just one thing that was important to him — just one thing! Are you begging God for many things, or are you asking Him for just that one thing: … that I may dwell in the house of the LORD all the days of my life, to gaze upon the beauty of the LORD and to seek him in his temple” (Psalm 27:4)?

In that psalm, David was praying that he would dwell in God’s presence and seek Him. Notice that his prayer had nothing to do with getting more worldly things from God.

So, instead of begging God to give you more worldly things, pray that you would dwell in the house of the Lord, knowing that when you seek first His kingdom and His righteousness, … all these things will be given to you as well(Matthew 6:33).

When you seek God, He promises to take care of all the things you need! Start seeking God’s presence, and He will give you His presents.

 

 



Word of the day

Are you seeking the gifts or the Giver?

Sometimes we get so caught up in seeking God’s presents that we forget all about His presence! God wants every believer to remain in His presence and have a personal relationship with Him just like you would with any other friend.

King David knew the importance of seeking God’s presence and dwelling with Him. In Psalm 27:4, David writes, One thing I ask of the Lord, this is what I seek: that I may dwell in the house of the Lord all the days of my life, to gaze upon the beauty of the Lord and to seek him in his temple. David set himself to seek and require one thing–God’s presence.

The next two verses (Psalm 27:5-6) tell us the rewards of seeking God: For in the day of trouble He will keep me safe in His dwelling; He will hide me in the shelter of His tabernacle and set me high upon a rock. Then my head will be exalted above the enemies who surround me; at His tabernacle will I sacrifice with shouts of joy; I will sing and make music to the Lord.

The rewards of seeking God are awesome; not only will you develop a closer relationship with God, but you will also find true joy and contentment.

Psalm 16:11 says, You will fill me with joy in your presence. In other words, joy is found in God’s presence–not His presents! Therefore, evaluate your life to make sure that you’re seeking God, not just His gifts.
 


Word of the day

Use your words as building blocks not battering rams.

Every word you say will have an affect on others. Positive words will encourage and strengthen other people, but negative words will tear down and harm them. You must decide whether to speak positively or negatively. Please understand that speaking positively requires a deliberate decision, whereas speaking negatively comes easily—for it is human nature. Therefore, actively strive to speak positive and encouraging words to others.

It is no surprise that the Bible instructs us to say beneficial things about others: “Do not let any unwholesome talk come out of your mouths, but only what is helpful for building others up according to their needs, that it may benefit those who listen” (Ephesians 4:29). Furthermore, Colossians 4:6 says, “Let your conversation be always full of grace, seasoned with salt …” Speaking positive, uplifting words is extremely important. Indeed, Proverbs 25:11says, “A word aptly spoken is like apples of gold in settings of silver.”

In Psalm 19:14, David prays, “May the words of my mouth and the meditation of my heart be pleasing in your sight, O Lord, my Rock and my Redeemer.” David clearly knew the importance of words, and so he prayed that he would speak words that were pleasing to God.

We must deliberately choose to speak positive words; otherwise, we will instinctively complain and be negative—for that is human nature. Thus, it is no surprise that Ecclesiastes 5:2 tells us, “Do not be quick with your mouth, do not be hasty in your heart to utter anything before God. God is in heaven and you are on earth, so let your words be few.” Similarly, Proverbs 10:19 says, “When words are many, sin is not absent, but he who holds his tongue is wise.”Usually when you “hold” your tongue, you’ll catch yourself before you say nasty things about others and cut them down with your words.

Lastly, it is important to understand that whatever you say is a reflection of your heart attitude. Matthew 12:34says, “For out of the overflow of the heart the mouth speaks” (also see Luke 6:45). In other words, your words are simply an overflow of what’s in your heart. If you think poorly about others, you’ll speak poorly about them. On the other hand, if you think positively about others, as the Bible instructs us to, then you’ll speak positively about them.

Since words carry power, make a decision to use your words as building blocks not battering rams.
 
 


Word of the Day

TOP 10 REASONS WHY CONSTANT COMPLAINING IS SO TOXIC IN THE WORKPLACE

God’s Promised & chosen people complained throughout their Journey from Egypt on their way to the Promised Land. They had the Kings of Kings and Lord of Lords on their Side but they still missed it.

Here’s why constant complaining is so bad:

1: It makes things look worse than they are
When people complain, they focus only on what’s wrong. Things may be mostly fine in the company, but complainers only talk about the problems, annoyances and peeves they perceive.

If things in a company are 80% good and 20% bad and you spend most of your time thinking and talking about the bad 20% – the situation will look a lot worse than it really is.

2: It becomes a habit
The more you complain, the easier it gets. In the end, everything is bad, every situation is a problem, every co-worker is a jerk and nothing is good.

The more you focus on the negative, the harder it gets to switch into a positive mindset.

3: You get what you focus on
According to Wikipedia, Confirmation bias is:

…a tendency to search for or interpret new information in a way that confirms one’s preconceptions and avoid information and interpretations which contradict prior beliefs.

In other words, what you already believe influences your perception of everything around you. That’s why constant complaining makes you see everything in a negative light, because your subconscious mind tries to make new observation fit with what you already know.

4: It leads to onedownmanship
A complaining session might go something like this:

The other day, my boss came in 5 minutes before I was leaving and asked me to finish two huge projects for him. I had to stay two hours and missed my football game.

Yeah, well my boss told me to work this weekend AND the next.

Hah, that’s nothing! My boss…

This type of interaction rewards the person with the worst story who can complain the loudest. Not healthy!

5: It makes people despondent
Not only does constant complaining make you see the workplace as worse than it really is, but because you’re constantly hearing stories of how bad things are and how they’re constantly getting worse it also destroys all hope that things can get better.

This of course makes people less likely to take action to improve their situation, because everybody knows it’s doomed to fail anyway.

6: It kills innovation
Because the situations looks so hopeless, people become less creative and innovative. What’s the point of coming up with ideas and implementing them – it’s never going to work anyway.

Also, chronic complainers are the first to shoot down any new idea.

7: It favors negative people
The way to get status among complainers is to be the most negative. To be the one who sees everything in the most negative light.

Any attempt to be positive or cheerful will be shot down and optimists will be accused of being Pollyanna, naive and unrealistic.

8: It promotes bad relationships
People who complain together unite against the world and can create strong internal relationships based on this. But these relationships are based mostly on negative experiences. That’s not healthy.

It also means that you can only continue to be a part of the group if you can continue to complain, miring you even deeper in a complaint mindset.

9: It creates cliques
Being positive, optimistic and appreciative makes you more open towards other people – no matter who they are. It becomes easy to connect to co-workers in other departments, projects or divisions.

Complaining, on the other hand, makes people gather in cliques with their fellow complainers where they can be critical and suspicious of everybody else.

10: Pessimism is bad for you
Research in positive psychology has shown that people who see the world in a positive light have a long list of advantages, including:

  • They live longer
  • They’re healthier
  • They have more friends and better social lives
  • They enjoy life more
  • They’re more successful at work

We sometimes think that pessimists and complainers have the edge because they see problems sooner but the truth is that optimists not only lead better lives, they’re also more successful because they believe that what they’re doing is going to work.

The upshot

Constant complaining in the workplace is toxic. It can drain the happiness, motivation, creativity and fun from a whole company. Wherever it’s going on it must be addressed and handled properly.

I’m NOT saying that we should never complain at work – quite the contrary. If you see a problem in your workplace, complain to whoever can do something about it.

What we should avoid at all costs, is constant bitching and moaning, where we’re always complaining about the same things, to the same people, in the same way, day in and day out.

So what can we do about it? Well first of all, each of us can learn to complain constructively. This means learning to complain in a way that leads to the problem being fixed – rather than to more complaining. H

Secondly, we can learn to deal with the chronic complainers we meet at work. Unfortunately, our traditional strategies like trying to cheer them up or suggesting solutions for their problems don’t work because complainers aren’t looking for encouragement or solutions.

Finally, you can train your own ability to be positive. Just like complaining can become a habit, so can being appreciative, optimistic and grateful. 
 



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